The Museum Oskars 2014: Winners Part 4

Thanks to everyone who nominated their favourite museums for our first ever ‘Museum Oskars’. Usually this it the point where you say “the votes have been counted and verified”, but in our eyes, this year everyone is a winner! If someone loved a museum enough to nominate it, then that’s good enough for us. There’s plenty of competition out there already. Since there were twelve categories, we’ve been introducing three categories each day this week, with a final roundup tomorrow. Our technical whiz, Simon, has also crafted some very nice badges for each category, so if you are one of the winning museums, please feel free to use these on your blogs, social media profile, websites etc if you so wish. So, without much further ado, here is the final round of winners:

Biggest ‘WOW’ Moment

England

  • National Gallery, London
  • Walking into the Lady Lever Gallery in Port Sunlight
  • Taking the toddlers into the Tate Modern’s free exhibition of Gaba. So stimulating and interactive.
  • Buckingham Palace with my daughter, hands down. (And MuseomixUK)
  • Takeover Day at Ancient House Museum in Thetford- the Teenager History Club the young ran an open evening with activities for visitors, including showing them how to make pomanders. They had also developed their own range of souvenirs for the museum shop, to sell during the event.
  • The El Bulli exhibition at Somerset House, because I had no expectations at all and never knew food could be this visually pleasing.
  • Watching kids get covered with paint at Haslemere Educational Museum for Early Years footprint event – not what you usually expect at a ‘traditional’ museum.

Germany

  • “Federtextilien“ (feather textiles) in “INKA – Könige der Anden”, Linden-Museum Stuttgart.
  • Medizinhistorisches Museum (Medical History Museum) der Charité, Berlin – Seeing the world’s largest collection of gall stones – with some of the world’s largest gall stones – was a bit of an unusual WOW moment!

Italy

  • Seeing the Barberini harp (usually conserved in the Museo degli Strumenti Musicali) on display at the Galleria Nazionale di Arte Antica di Palazzo Barberini in Rome, in the original Barberini context.

Netherlands

  • Kunsthal Rotterdam- Jean Paul Gaultier addressing the audience via an interactive projection.
  • Edward Kienholz, The Beanery (1965), part of the collection of Stedelijk Museum, Amsterdam. A great piece of artwork that you can enter one person at a time. You enter into a different world, which is a bit scary but a lot of fun too.

Scotland

  • Concorde at the National Museum of Flight is always a wow moment.

Sweden

  • Vasa Museum, Stockholm –the moment, in which you enter the dimly lit building and see the world‘s  only original preserved ship from the 17th century in its full size and glory!

USA

  • Metropolitan Museum, New York City
  • Sufi Dance at the Mariposa Museum, Peterborough, New Hampshire
  • Behind the Scenes Tweetup at the Smithsonian National Museum of American History – talking to the curator of the jazz collection and seeing memorabilia from Ella Fitzgerald, Duke Ellington and Ray Charles close up. Just WOW!
  • “Diaghilev and the Ballets Russes, 1909–1929: When Art Danced with Music” at the National Gallery of Art, Washington, D.C. – stunning and intricate display of costumes and sets. The visit transported you into each ballet, a magical experience.
  • Aviation Museum of Kentucky – when we were visited by some of the old WW-2 Aircraft, we were told by the aircrews of the planes, that we were the best group of support people they had ever encountered, what can you say but WOW.
  • National WWII Museum, New Orleans (x2) – Entering the Freedom pavilion. Suspended from the ceiling were a B-17, B-25, P-51, Douglas Dauntless dive bomber, TBM Avenger, F-4 Corsair. WOW FACTOR;  Realizing just how much of the Pacific theatre I remembered from WWII AND putting two & two together why my dive buddies go to Truk & Palau! They dive the sunken fleet!

You can either download the image and upload it to your own website (if doing so, please include a link back to this page) or use the HTML code below to include it directly from Museum 140:

<a href=”http://www.museum140.com/2014/02/03/the-museum-oskars-2014-winners-part-4/”><img alt=”” src=”http://www.museum140.com/wp-content/uploads/2014/02/biggest-wow-moment.png” width=”300″ height=”200″ /></a>

Best ‘Hidden Gem’ Discovery

Best ‘Hidden Gem’ discovery

Australia

  • The Nicholson Museum in Sydney

England

  • Portland Basin Museum, Tameside
  • The Courtauld Gallery in London
  • The Roman Bath Museum, York – It’s small, damp and has some horrendous signs and illustrations but dammit that place has character! And it’s under a pub.
  • Canterbury Roman Museum – it was full of life with handling collections, a young couple playing a Roman game in a mocked up Roman dining room…the collection includes items literally from beneath the streets dug up by Canterbury Archaeological Trust. There is Roman glass to marvel at, jewels, water-pipes, swords, silver treasure and, of course, then there are the mosaics in situ.

France

  • The contemporary jewellery section in the Museum Les Art Décoratifs in Paris. The collection they have is really surprising, with pieces from a lot of international well known jewellery makers.

Germany

  • Schwules Museum (Gay Museum), Berlin – very engaged staff and lovingly curated exhibitions that always have a personal character.
  • Red Dot Design Museum, Essen – a bit off the beaten path on the site of the ‘Zeche Zollverein‘, a visit here is worth it alone for the unusual ways in which various design icons are displayed on the walls of the old boiler house.
  • Buchstabenmuseum (Museum of Letters), Berlin – letters of all sizes and fonts, from Berlin, Germany and further afield
  • The ‘Deutsches Zollmuseum’ in Hamburg – who would have thought a museum all about customs, tolls and duties would be so interesting!

Italy

  • The ‘not so known’ Galleria Nazionale d’Arte Antica in Palazzo Corsini in Rome, in spite of its prestigious history and precious collections.

Poland

  • Tarnow Ethnographic Museum –  History of Sinti and Roma, active communication and outreach, and revitilisation of traditions.

Scotland

  • The Black Watch Castle and Museum in Perth. Newly refurbished telling the great story of one of Scotland’s finest regiments .
  • The fantastic Shetland Museum. Great location – enjoy your coffee in the café overlooking the harbour, wonderful content telling the story of Shetland and lovely building. It’s a must-see.

USA

  • Chemistry History Foundation, Philadelphia
  • New York Hispanic Society
  • The Sewall Belmont House, Washington, D.C.
  • National Museum of the US Navy, at the Navy Yard in Washington, D.C.
  • Art Museum of the Americas, Washington, D.C.  – this museum has a really powerful collection, and it is easily overlooked in . Most museum friends of mine have barely heard of it.
  • Illinois State Military Museum, Springfield – this museum has a really well-done and informative exhibition and one of the most moving tributes to fallen Illinois Soldiers. It is just a wall with framed photographs on walls, but family members can put mementos next to the frames, and this made the individuals real in a way that no static display could. Plus they have Gen. Santa Anna’s wooden leg. Who knew?
  • Aviation Museum Of Kentucky, Lexington –  visitors always tell us what an excellent small museum it is that wasn’t known to them until they drove by it and saw it.
  • National Cryptologic Museum, Fort Mead, Maryland –  this totally FREE museum features ‘hands-on’ use of a genuine World War II-era Enigma machine, and a fascinating display on ‘Hobo signs and symbols’.

You can either download the image and upload it to your own website (if doing so, please include a link back to this page) or use the HTML code below to include it directly from Museum 140:

<a href=”http://www.museum140.com/2014/02/03/the-museum-oskars-2014-winners-part-4/”><img alt=”” src=”http://www.museum140.com/wp-content/uploads/2014/02/best-hidden-gem.png” width=”300″ height=”200″ /></a>

Personal Favourite of 2013

Denmark

  • Post & Tele Museum, Copenhagen – just brilliant, the whole family loved it!

England

  • The Lady Lever Gallery, Port Sunlight as so utterly unexpected.
  • The Ashmolean, Oxford
  • Canterbury Roman Museum
  • Ironbridge Gorge Museum – they believed in Museomix UK and trusted us.
  • Probably Museum of Science and Industry, Manchester, on my two year old’s birthday. She just loves it and had such an amazing time it was brilliant to see.
  • HMS Trincomalee, Hartlepool, because she is such a beautiful, sympathetically restored frigate, and so much of her is original. They have managed an excellent balance between authenticity and education/entertainment. You can wander and climb all over the ship.
  • Haslemere Educational Museum (x2) – Meeting Sophie, Countess of Wessex and seeing her taking out the inside of the dummy mummy and really interacting with the kids; For a small, local museum it has such a wide range of activities and exhibits- we could spend hours there each week!”

Germany

  • Naturkundemuseum, Berlin – a perennial favourite, who can argue with a room full of dinosaurs!
  • Jüdisches Museum, Berlin – our ‘go to’ museum for Sunday afternoons

Italy

  • Musei Capitolini, Rome, known as the most ancient public museum in the world, for the extraordinary variety of collections from the antiquity to the modern times and for the richness and originality of the exhibitions offer.

Luxembourg

  • The National Military Museum in Luxembourg…the dioramas were amazing!!!

Netherlands

  • I really enjoyed the Tropenmuseum in Amsterdam. It is a beautiful venue and you can spend hours looking at the collection and diving into other cultures. The restaurant of course also is a very good bonus to a great museum experience.
  • The Tassenmuseum (Museum of Bags) in Amsterdam was great – it opens your eyes to the diversity of bags, men’s included!

Poland

  • Tarnow Ethnographic Museum – History of Sinti and Roma, active communication and outreach, and revitalisation of traditions.  And in a difficult sociopolitical environment and with hardly any money. Very remarkable.

Scotland

  • National Museum of Scotland (x2) -Great collections in a fantastic building; The world under one roof, and always feel welcomed with open arms.

Sweden

  • Vasa Museum, Stockholm – the most visited museum in Sweden, and deservedly so. Where else would a museum be conceivable, whose highlight is dedicated to the nation’s own ridiculousness? For that alone you have to love Sweden.

Switzerland

  • Fondation Beyeler – my absolute favourite museum in the most beautiful building by Renzi Piano, with my favourite artworks by Mark Rothko and my favourite figures by Giacometti (secret tip: marveling at Monet’s Japanese Bridge and Waterlilies, on a giant white leather couch next to an artificially created pond with view of the garden).

USA

  • The Vacuum Cleaner Museum, Saint James, Missouri
  • National WWII Museum, New Orleans
  • Museum of Jurassic Technology, California
  • Mass MOCA (Massachusetts Museum of Contemporary Art)
  • Huntington Museum of Art, West Virginia
  • Gutai Card Box from Gutai: Splendid Playground at the Guggenheim, New York City
  • Hirshhorn Museum, Washington, D.C. – They have an amazing collection, the new exhibits are always exciting, and their exhibits always make me think critically and ask questions. They are working with content that offends many…and so they work hard at enticing an audience. The Friday lunch talks are great, and they bring in a bunch of artists for evening lectures. Always interesting, inspiring, and full of wit.
  • Grand Rapids Public Museum in Grand Rapids, Michigan – I entered not knowing what to expect. I truly enjoyed my visit and the exhibits were so well done, that I just kept saying, “Wow.” It all seemed so kid/family friendly, and yet, I was totally engaged as an adult. All of the docents we met were very knowledgeable and friendly.
  • The Aviation Museum of Kentucky, Lexington,  is not supported by the Goverment and I would put it up against almost any small museum in the country.
  • Mariposa Museum, Peterborough, New Hampshire – diverse offerings, friendly to all ages and open to the world.
  • American Wing of the Museum of Fine Arts, Boston, Massachusetts – I had been before when it first opened but this was a return to see old favorite paintings.  To my surprise many of them were not on display.  It made me looks anew at the paintings that were on display and found some new friends that I’ll be happy to visit the next time I’m in Boston.

You can either download the image and upload it to your own website (if doing so, please include a link back to this page) or use the HTML code below to include it directly from Museum 140:

<a href=”http://www.museum140.com/2014/02/03/the-museum-oskars-2014-winners-part-4/”><img alt=”” src=”http://www.museum140.com/wp-content/uploads/2014/02/personal-favourite.png” width=”300″ height=”200″ /></a>

0 Comments

No comments yet.

Leave a Reply